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New Discoveries

I've been going over the archive this last month trying to pull out the important pieces in hopes of putting an exhibiton together. Here are some of the gems from my digging around. Of course this doesn't even begin to cover it. What to choose? There are litterly hundreds of wonderful drawings, watercolors, sketches and designs.

One of my father's last commissions.

As an artist sensitive to inclusion of all ethnic groups and races, Douglas Phillips integrated his windows with people from all different backgrounds. 

Douglas Phillips's glass was inspired. He broke from the traditional gothic themes and incoporated the engery from his facisnation with the space program, jazz, and modern art. He introduced dynamic form and sweeping ribbons of color into stained glass beginning in the mid 1950's. 

This is from a series of windows Douglas Phillips
made inspired by our space program in the 1960's

Below: Pen and ink drawings for faceted glass windows

Selection of figures from African American History


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Update on Douglas Phillips Retrospective


My father's archive arrived from Cleveland a couple of months ago. There are drawings from high school, college, commercial sketches and drawings, early stained glass panels, beautiful renderings in both pencil and charcoal, watercolors, nude drawings and paintings, portraits, letters, documents--
There are about 700 drawings, watercolors and sketches at the framers for conversation, matting and framing. And there are 14 glass panels. Where to begin!?
For anyone wishing to support this project and become a sponsor- please get in touch with me. 
Thank you!
Elisabeth Sunday

Advertising Art: early 1940's

Father's Day Remembrance

originally posted at Studio Notes

Stained GlassArtist
Myfather's stained glass studio, called "Phillips Stained Glass" was founded in Cleveland in about 1952. It was an enchanting playground and I am fond of saying I grew up there. Beginning when I was only two, my father gave me a box of glass scraps and jewels to play with. I stood on a stool over a light table and and glued different colors and shapes of glass onto a larger sheet of blue or green glass working out a scene. Once I was finished, his glazer, a wonderful man by the name of Lou Buser, would wrap lead around it and solder a little hook at the top so it could be hung in the window. 
Douglas Phillips had an awesome talent. He was one of those artists who could have made his living painting perfect replicas of master works. He once told me painting in other people's styles was the best way to learn and discover your own vision. Indeed, there wasn't anything he couldn't rende…